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20121201
20121231
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Book TV 13
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CSPAN2 13
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English 13
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 2:00pm EST
. [applause] >> thank you, david, everybody for coming. today i would like to engage all of us in a discussion of the question of the book. it's an easy question to state -- i'm sorry easy to answer what should be the role of money in markets in our society? today there are fewer things that money can't buy. if you are sentenced to a jail term and california just in case that happens to anyone of you, you should know that if you don't like the standard accommodations you can buy a prison cell upgrade. it's true. for how much, do you suppose? how much do you think it costs? $5,000? $90 a night. or if you are a tourist suppose you go to washington, d.c. on the congressional hearing that there may be a very long line if it is a popular hearing. and you may not like standing in long lines you can now go to a company called line standing dhaka, and pay them a certain amount of money. they will hire someone usually a homeless person or someone that needs to work to hold the place on line for hours and hours overnight if need be. and when the hearing begins, you can take your place in the line and go
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 10:30am EST
rich, rats, cross-country , the throw you don't know, and the one that brings us here, my american revolution. in mine and humble opinion each of these books is its own line and masterpiece. wonderfully idiosyncratic, uniquely incisive. each is an investigation of the american my state and song skate into relative with the american landscape. fleet contends the obvious, whether a garbage dump comes or the species despise rodents or family richard or a transcendental and back and allows us to see what we didn't and will we couldn't will we didn't want to, the spiritual, historical, and is essential connections that exposed, so vert, demolish are comfortable presumptions and require us to perceive people and places and, yes, ra t s with fresh eyes. i have been amazed, enlightened, educated, entertained. none more so than my american revolution. until i read his book, i thought i was reasonably conversant for college graduate of 40 years ago about the american revolution. the war we all know, but mostly in massachusetts, virginia, and the carolinas. war in which the high road, no army
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 12:00pm EST
] but these guys, the poignant testimonies you were telling us because we live in a society where here are front line first responders. these guys tell stories about intervening in petty crime. we had one of the buildings that was targeted by some people who had terroristic intents, and they're on the front lines with this. and yet we can only pay them $7 and change an hour. and they have no benefits, they have no retirement security. one guy was telling me he's worked for ten years, no health care. if he gets sick, he has to try to come to work and work through the sickness. and that's not the america that i think of. and so i'm really hoping this week just to finish the answer, the overly-long answer is to, um, really bring more attention to these problems. and right now, this session, congress is going to be debating cuts in the s.n.a.p. program. and in this time of austerity, we can't be dumb and cut things that ultimately provide long-term benefits that are really not -- entitlements, they're really investments in us and our society, and we should begin to prioritize these things federally
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 7:00pm EST
that is still with us. the volcker rule label was announced to the press by obama january 2010, paul volcker by their role. -- by the president. he heard his name and thought what is that? i think the phrase in the book describing paul volcker is the man who could find fault with the mona lisa. [laughter] he made a living saying no. goldberg 1970s one. inflation 1979. speculation 2010. the underlying story line is trust which is the title of the last chapter of the book you can go there and skip the stories obama appointed him chairman of the advisory board the former president of italy wrote paul volcker a letter that still sits in a coma frame on his desk that says we trust you. and i show how he earned the trust and to follow-up with the lessons he learned about trust and his father senior 1930 through 1950 had a quotation from george washington hanging in a frame behind his desk in a letter he wrote to his officers at the time it said do not suffer your good nature to say yes and you ought to say no. remember it is not a private cause to be injured urban if it did buy your car is" he has
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 12:00am EST
sullivan is not the robert sullivan who is with us this evening. not exactly, but more about that in a moment. first this robert sullivan is the author of seven extraordinary books, meadowlands, the whale hunt, how do not to get rich, rats, cross-country, the thoreau you don't know and the one that brings us here to delancey st., "my american revolution." in my humble opinion each of these books is in its way a masterpiece. wonderfully idiosyncratic, uniquely incisive, e. tizon investigation of the american mindscape and sulzgeber related with the american landscape. each confronts the obvious, where there are garbage drunk -- garbage dump or a family road trip or a transcendental windbag and allows us to see what we didn't and what we couldn't and that we did not want to, the spiritual, historical, existential connections that expose, subvert, demolish presumptions and require us to receive people and places and yes, rats with fresh eyes. i've been amazed, enlightened, educated and contained by robert sullivan's books, none more so than "my american revolution." until i read
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 8:15pm EST
, in afghanistan people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they've all come there. there is a big crowd on the mall. ayaan going to speak to you today about this great historic subject, this great american institution. and i am going to do it in the same way in which i organized the book. the book is not chronological. it's not divided that starts off with george washington and then john adams and guinn for the president. instead, its slash the various parts of the day, and within each part of the day i sprinkle with vignettes some of the very serious and some of them traditional. a lot of them are all events because i'm always looking for those. i'm also going to cover some things that we are not going to see in the of coming inauguration in january because this time we don't have a change of power so we are not going to have that transition as we see sometimes but nevertheless at inauguration when a president does leave office here is the white eisenhower thinking the staff at the white house. at the same time the incoming president they are leaving the house getting ready for t
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 4:00pm EST
around the country, paris, barack, afghanistan, people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they have all come there. there is a big crowd of a mall. of going to speak to you today about this great historic subject to my great american institution the end of not -- i'm going to do it in the same way in which i organize the book rather, the book is not chronological, it's not divided up. this touch of a george washington in mid john adams and went to the president in order. instead is divided up by the various parts of the day. within each part of the day i sprinkle in vignettes. some of them very serious, some of them, of course, very traditional command a lot of them on all events because i'm always looking for those, too. i'm also going to cover some things that were not going tessie in the upcoming in a garish in january because this time we don't have a change of power. we're not going to have the transition as we see some times. nevertheless, in the morning at inaugurations when a president does leave office, 1961, here is toyed d. eisenhower thinking the staff at the
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 10:00am EST
of you for coming here this afternoon and thank the boston book festival for having us. don't they do a nice job? isn't this a terrific eventsome. >> yes. [applause] >> let's also thank the plymouth rock foundation for sponsoring this particular session and say that without their generosity, it would be hard to put on events like this that add to the cultural life that we all enjoy in this great city. so so thanks to them. [applause] and in a way that's what we're here to talk about this afternoon, the triumph of this city and all the cities, the triumph of the city, that's the title of harvard economics professor ed glaeser's book. it's about what's made cities around the world great, about the challenges that they have had to overcome and still face. we're going to talk about b that in a few minutes in the special context of this city with our panel, and we'll take questions from you as well later. but, first, to launch us off with a presentation, here's the author, professor ed glaeser. [applause] >> thank you. thank you, bob. and thank you all so much for being here. i'm so enormo
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 8:00am EST
? it was something i was going back and forth. for those who use social media, things are dumb frankly. i was getting into an intellectual question about the role of government. the person said government should not provide for the nutrition of children and it struck a chord with me because i don't think people think about what that would mean. we don't realize we live in a society where we make small amount of investments early, we make big investments lake. we all in fact are deeply invested in the success of kids because the more the economy grows, artists, teachers, professors and a entrepreneurs, children are the greatest natural resource we have in america, our children. my late -- this woman says this, i go back and she says why don't we see what it is like to live on food stamps or the snap program. i went to bed thinking no big deal. it was a big story. thiokol my staff. guess what i am doing? but it was a powerful thing. one of 14 cities in america with a food policy director and we had done a lot of work when trying to expand affordable health options. i said this is a great thing. we coul
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:30am EST
at large and michael duffy, executive editor for time magazine chronicle the relationship between the u.s. presidents in the president's club in side the world's most exclusive fraternity. political commentator kevin phillips recounts what he believes was the most important year of the american revolution which was 1775, a good year for revolutions. for an extended list of links to various publications, 2012 novel book selections visit the book tv website, booktv.org or our facebook page facebook.com/booktv . >> up next on book tv, richard wolff and david bersamian talk about our economic crisis and argue that it can be traced back to the 1970's when our economic system shifted from benefiting a vast majority of americans to one which mostly benefits only the very rich. this is about an hour-and-a-half. [applause] >> good to see you will hear. let's cut quickly to the chase. what is it and the dna of capitalism that makes this so unstable? >> since the beginning of economics as a discipline back in the days of adam smith and david mccarty who were the first to develop it as a comprehensiv
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 10:00pm EST
it in the competition among brodrick came us to make his fortune, he basically wanted to be a senator. that's what his plan was. tom came along and an assortment of the weirdest guys you ever saw, the worlds ugliest man, have you a chance, murderous, gunslingers, conmen, just absolutely amazing people. i thought it got to write this. as i work in a release we are very close to it the tom sawyer met mark twain in may of 1863 about three blocks from here. the old thing in the same room. twain liked to talk to tom because tom movies free stories and they played cards and drink here matching campaign. so that was the genesis. i thought this has got to be written. so while the series of tiny bits and pieces, diaries and stuff; it's a. but this is a result. i took out as they do, 40,000 words. can you imagine? spicer have over shop may mark, but i do love it. it's the most fun. i guess they could read you some know if you'd like. this may take a second. i've never read in public record. so i'll start with a quote from tom sawyer. this is the. i have to read this unfortunately. you want to know how i come to
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 5:15pm EST
, that's the saloon they used to go to at night, and describe the whole doings, and i'd try to beat his arm by saying i used to play one when i was young. listen to these pranks of mine with great interest, and he'd occasionally take them down in his notebook. one day he says to me, i'm going to put you between the covers of a book some of these days, tom. go ahead, sam, i said. but don't disgrace my name. so that's an interview with the real tom sawyer from the san francisco call in october 23rd of 1898. so he gave multiple interviews. so this is the prologue, and this'll give you an idea of what we were just talking about with the steam bath. it was the first tom sawyer had ever seen mark twain looking glum. sawyer studied the journalist; loose-jointed body with, coarse tumble of fiery hair, long, black, he'dal-looking cigar and soup stringer moustache. a rangy, lanky man, twain didn't really walk but ambled and slouched his way through the muddy streets and back alleys of san francisco. his normal dress was careless and disheveled. his clothings were unbrushed and freckled with tobac
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 6:00pm EST
parents can tell us. >> host: are you done with columbine? >> guest: am i done with columbine? i think so, but yeah, after a year or less after columbine, "the new york times" asked me to do a reported piece on the dash comac in denver and iceboat spent four days doing that and i was so thrilled to do something so lighthearted, nothing violent here, just people having fun and i said at that time, i am never doing another story on murder as long as i live. it was a huge emotional relief. but then i kept coming back. almost done with "columbine." my editors talk to me about perhaps a paperback afterward or something and i'm still talking to you. i have a u.k. tour in a week and, but i think i'm just about done. i would like to be done. i felt a huge relief after i turned in the final pages but i didn't even notice right away, within the next month friends started asking me you know, what is going on? you seem happier. are you dating someone? really, is there something going on? no, i turned up look in. it was finally off my chest. it was for better or worse after i turned bad in. i
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13